Introducing Progressive CA-410 Probes for Measuring ⌀2.1mm, ⌀4mm Small Spot Areas and Viewing Angle Characteristics of Displays at Vehicle Display 2020 Expo

October 2020 - Konica Minolta Sensing Americas, Inc. (Konica Minolta) highlights its progressive technology within its display measurement product line at the Vehicle Display Virtual 2020 Expo scheduled for October 14th through October 15th, 2020. The presentation of Konica Minolta’s latest probes used in measuring ⌀2.1mm (model CA-VP402), ⌀4mm (model CA-VP404) and viewing angle characteristics (CA-VP410T) of displays is the first of its kind available to the display industry will be available for review. These progressive instruments for AR/VR head-mounted displays and curved OLED displays for luminance, chromaticity and flicker (in JEITA, VESA and FMA) use the new CA-410 probes to measure ⌀2.1mm, ⌀4mm and viewing angle characteristics.

The Small Spot Probe, CA-VP402 has a measuring area diameter of ⌀2.1mm. The dedicated optical system and operation algorithm provides both guaranteed accuracy at low luminance and small measurement area. Suitable for applications requiring small-area measurements ranging from low luminance measurements, such as for gamma adjustment of micro OLED, to that of high-speed, high-accuracy measurements. An additional Small Spot Probe, CA-VP404 has a measuring area diameter of ⌀4mm. The guaranteed accuracy from 0.004 cd/m2 enables high-speed, high-accuracy measurements of small areas such as smartwatch OLEDs, smartphones, and small APL (average pixel level) windows.

Also available in the collection is the high sensitivity probe (⌀27mm, ⌀10mm) which is primarily used for OLED displays and offers superb chromaticity repeatability, particularly on lower level luminance displays. The ⌀10mm Long-Working Distance Probe (CA-VP410T) has a measurement distance of 200mm to the sample and is extremely valuable in viewing angle measurements with the same ability as other CA-410 Probes in measuring luminance, chromaticity, and flicker. Its ability to take multi-angle measurements of in-vehicle displays or smartphone OLEDs is due to its ability to measure displays regardless of its directionality. In addition, the long working distance probe allows it to be used in applications when distance from the item being measured is important. This valuable feature is often used in production measurement systems when the need to avoid collisions with the item being measured is imperative.

Konica Minolta’s Display Color Analyzer CA-410 series is used for high-speed measurement of precise luminance, chromaticity and flicker of any types of HDR displays. CA-410’s highly-accurate sensor technology allows users to be able to accurately measure and adjust the chromaticity and white balance of displays that have a recent wide color gamut. It can also easily integrate into an existing automatic measurement system using a complimentary SDK (Software Development Kit) and capture flicker measurement with high sampling rate and wider frequency measurement range that covers all types of displays. Konica Minolta Sensing Americas prides itself in offering exceptionally advanced optical technology that precisely measures color and light. Its light and display measurement instruments provide reliable results in research, quality control, and display performance industries. Its instruments are used in labs to measure luminance, illuminance, chromaticity, color temperature and flicker of light sources for quality control, government testing, photography and cinematography worldwide.

About Konica Minolta Sensing

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas Inc. (KMSA), a wholly owned subsidiary of Konica Minolta, Inc., Sensing Business Unit is recognized as the international leader of industrial color and light measurement. The company is responsible for product lines that continuously revolutionize how visual perception is measured by the world. KMSA’s corporate headquarters in Ramsey, New Jersey is fully equipped with a state of the art service center, technical support center, and a focused sales force dedicated to both the North American and South American regions.

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas Inc. is ‘The Standard in Measuring Color, Light, and Display’. Konica Minolta provides advanced optical technology that precisely measures the elements of color and light. Our products are a staple in research and manufacturing environments, helping organizations to meet product quality and operational goals with less waste, time, and effort. This commitment to creating value for customers is the core principle behind the Konica Minolta brand. It’s also the driving force behind the high level of quality and precision built into each of our products and why we’re the technological leader in color and light measurement solutions today.

To learn more, please contact: Peter J. Roos, Marketing Manager
Phone: (201) 236-4300 or Toll Free: (888)473-2625
Email: marketing.sus@konicaminolta.com or Visit Us Online: https://sensing.konicaminolta.us


Introducing Progressive CA-410 Probes for Measuring ⌀2.1mm, ⌀4mm Small Spot Areas and Viewing Angle Characteristics of Displays at Virtual Display Week Expo

August 2020 - Konica Minolta Sensing Americas, Inc. highlights its progressive technology within its display measurement product line at the Virtual Display Week 2020 Expo scheduled for August 3rd through August 7th, 2020. The presentation of Konica Minolta’s latest probes used in measuring ⌀2.1mm (model CA-VP402), ⌀4mm (model CA-VP404) and viewing angle characteristics (CA-VP410T) of displays is the first of its kind available to the display industry will be available for review.

These progressive instruments for AR/VR head-mounted displays and curved OLED displays for luminance, chromaticity and flicker (in JEITA, VESA and FMA) use the new CA-410 probes to measure ⌀2.1mm, ⌀4mm and viewing angle characteristics. The Small Spot Probe, CA-VP402 has a measuring area diameter of ⌀2.1mm. The dedicated optical system and operation algorithm provides both guaranteed accuracy at low luminance and small measurement area. Suitable for applications requiring small-area measurements ranging from low luminance measurements, such as for gamma adjustment of micro OLED, to that of high-speed, high-accuracy measurements. An additional Small Spot Probe, CA-VP404 has a measuring area diameter of ⌀4mm. The guaranteed accuracy from 0.004 cd/m2 enables high-speed, high-accuracy measurements of small areas such as smartwatch OLEDs, smartphones, and small APL (average pixel level) windows.

Also available in the collection is the high sensitivity probe (⌀27mm, ⌀10mm) which is primarily used for OLED displays and offers superb chromaticity repeatability, particularly on lower level luminance displays. The ⌀10mm Long-Working Distance Probe (CA-VP410T) has a measurement distance of 200mm to the sample and is extremely valuable in viewing angle measurements with the same ability as other CA-410 Probes in measuring luminance, chromaticity, and flicker. Its ability to take multi-angle measurements of in-vehicle displays or smartphone OLEDs is due to its ability to measure displays regardless of its directionality. In addition, the long working distance probe allows it to be used in applications when distance from the item being measured is important. This valuable feature is often used in production measurement systems when the need to avoid collisions with the item being measured is imperative.

Konica Minolta’s Display Color Analyzer CA-410 series is used for high-speed measurement of precise luminance, chromaticity and flicker of any types of HDR displays. CA-410’s highly-accurate sensor technology allows users to be able to accurately measure and adjust the chromaticity and white balance of displays that have a recent wide color gamut. It can also easily integrate into an existing automatic measurement system using a complimentary SDK (Software Development Kit) and capture flicker measurement with high sampling rate and wider frequency measurement range that covers all types of displays.

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas prides itself in offering exceptionally advanced optical technology that precisely measures color and light. Its light and display measurement instruments provide reliable results in research, quality control, and display performance industries. Its instruments are used in labs to measure luminance, illuminance, chromaticity, color temperature and flicker of light sources for quality control, government testing, photography and cinematography worldwide.

About Konica Minolta Sensing

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas Inc. (KMSA), a wholly owned subsidiary of Konica Minolta, Inc., Sensing Business Unit is recognized as the international leader of industrial color and light measurement. The company is responsible for product lines that continuously revolutionize how visual perception is measured by the world. KMSA’s corporate headquarters in Ramsey, New Jersey is fully equipped with a state of the art service center, technical support center, and a focused sales force dedicated to both the North American and South American regions.

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas Inc. is ‘The Standard in Measuring Color, Light, and Display’. Konica Minolta provides advanced optical technology that precisely measures the elements of color and light. Our products are a staple in research and manufacturing environments, helping organizations to meet product quality and operational goals with less waste, time, and effort. This commitment to creating value for customers is the core principle behind the Konica Minolta brand. It’s also the driving force behind the high level of quality and precision built into each of our products and why we’re the technological leader in color and light measurement solutions today.

To learn more, please contact; Peter J. Roos, Marketing Manager

Phone; (201) 236-4300 or Toll Free; (888)473-2625

Email; marketing.sus@konicaminolta.com or Visit Us Online; https://sensing.konicaminolta.us


Using UV Light to Kill Bacteria

The use of light to kill bacteria or “superbug” (bacteria that is resistant to most antibiotics) is not a new phenomenon and has been around since 1878. Arthur Downes and Thomas P. Blunt published a paper in 1878 on the properties of short wavelength light and its role in sterilization of bacteria. Later In 1903, Niels Finsen was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his use of UV for the treatment of the disease lupus vulgaris.

Over the years, despite the imposed limitations and environmental concerns with mercury, the best choice for these disinfection lights were often UV mercury lamps. Consequently, the demand for lower cost options that consumed less energy and without mercury evolved- the UV LED. UV LEDs (light emitting diodes) can produce wavelengths with a peak between 260 nm and 270 nm. This provides a powerful enough germicidal wavelength to be used as a disinfectant. Industries focused on air and water pollution, including the medical field find much use for these UV LEDs. The UVC disinfection is a physical process that disrupts the DNA of harmful microorganisms and destroys their ability to reproduce. It is important to note that this method does not help those people who are already infected by a virus but rather, helps in reducing the ability for the virus to reproduce itself on surfaces, reducing the spread of contamination. It is not a replacement for traditional cleaning and chemical disinfection protocols (wiping down a medical device or piece of medical equipment). As an effective solution for disinfection, UVC LEDs give medical equipment and device manufacturers the opportunity to assist their end-users with infection control and to create safer healthcare settings.

Today we see this UVC ‘blue light’ being used in disinfecting, subways, buses, banks disinfecting money, and used by robots for cleaning hospital floors. In addition, many companies are also manufacturing portable UVC lights that decontaminate areas frequently exposed to viruses. These handheld instruments can be especially useful in vehicles used by hospitals, EMS, police, and fire departments to assist in sterilizing their vehicles.

Most recently observed, is the impressive short turnaround time in development of these disinfection robots and instruments.  Specialist in the advanced manufacturing automation department at the Siemens Corporation located in China, helped produce a disinfection robot model using hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) and ultraviolet (UV) light and had it in production in only one week’s time. These robots are used in hospitals, government buildings, and health locations worldwide.

As commendable as this UVC ray is in killing viruses, it is equally important to remember and be aware of the extremely harmful effects it can have on the human skin and retina. Because of this danger, many industries now use an artificial replication of UVC to better control its usage as a disinfectant method. This controlled method is Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI). Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) is a disinfection method or process that uses short-wavelength ultraviolet (UV-C) light to kill microorganisms.

Today, the University of Nebraska uses the UVGI method in a controlled environment. With the dangerous shortages of personal protective equipment, the ability to use and reuse protective gear often becomes a real need. Recently, the University of Nebraska addressed this need with the development of a N95 Filtering Facemask Respirator Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation (UVGI) process for use in decontamination and reuse. They created a process to disinfect protective masks using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI).

As development and use of UVC and UVGI are becoming more readily available, such is the need for testing used to confirm the safety and accurate measurements of these instruments.

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas has been providing resources and instruments for many years as well as setting UV LED calibration standards and addressing the hazards of blue light through our various testing processes. Konica Minolta Sensing provides an all-in-one system for determining various measurement quantities and tools to verify measurement results. To learn more about our UV measurement instruments visit us at https://sensing.konicaminolta.us/us/technologies/uv-led-measurement/

Sources:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/corona-changing-industrial-world-how-digitalization-helping-helmrich/?articleId=6670717392777207808#comments-66707173927772
“Corona is changing the industrial world – how digitalization and automation are helping make production future-proof” by  Klaus Helmrich Member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and CEO Digital Industries

www.nebraskamed.com “N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirator Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation (UVGI) Process for Decontamination and Reuse

Downes, Arthur; Blunt, Thomas P. (19 December 1878). "On the Influence of Light upon Protoplasm". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. 28 (190–195): 199–212. Bibcode:1878RSPS...28..199Ddoi:10.1098/rspl.1878.0109.

"The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1903". Nobelprize.org. The Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2006-09-09.


Blue Light Safety

Discussions in lighting safety standards has become a growing topic of conversation as we see the significant increase of modern solid-state lighting (SSL) light sources and UVC “blue light” in our daily environment.

One specific concern is that of photobiological safety and its direct correlation to blue light hazard (BLH). Blue light between 400 nm and 500 nm causes photochemical damage to the retina and may lead to degeneration of the macula. The current international Standard IEC 62471 contains guidelines for evaluating the photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems. To ensure reliable evaluation, it places high demands on measuring equipment and procedures.

Konica Minolta Sensing and Instrument System provide measurement systems that can help determine the Blue Light Hazard risk of LED light sources and luminaires between 300 nm and 700 nm (i.e. only partially in the UV spectrum).  LEDs are classified by the international Technological Standards IEC 62471 for photobiological safety – the respective risk classes range from 0 (exempt) to 3 (high risk).

Konica Minolta Sensing and Instrument Systems offers two different Blue Light Hazard measurement systems, both based on our CAS 140D with stray light correction, covering the spectral range from 300 nm to 700 nm.  The stray light corrected CAS 140D Instrument Systems is the first to offer an array spectrometer that can reliably assess the blue light hazard from light sources within the prescribed limiting values. Prior, only double monochromators were recommended for this task, as an underestimation of the blue light hazard was possible in measurements with a spectroradiometer on array spectrometer basis due to stray light. The CAS 140D avoids this in two ways: The optics and mechanics used in the spectrograph block are optimized with regard to disturbing stray light. Additionally, a unique stray light correction matrix is integrated in the calibration procedure. Both innovations combined ensure an up to now unachieved precision in the determination of the blue light hazard with an array spectrometer.

Konica Minolta Sensing Americas has been providing resources and instruments for many years as well as setting UV LED calibration standards and addressing the hazards of blue light through our various testing processes. To learn more about our UV measurement instruments visit us at https://sensing.konicaminolta.us/us/technologies/uv-led-measurement/