Konica Minolta Sensing Americas Color Trends and Technology Newsletter
Eggplant   CM-600d and CM-700d Spectrophotometers Video

Fifty Shades of “Black”
  New Video: Accessories to Enhance Color Measurement Performance
It is quite remarkable, and unrealized by most, that the average person can perceive millions of colors. These colors vary from light to dark and dull to vibrant, capturing an extraordinary array of hues seen by the human eye. Many of these colors, however, are often mistaken for other colors, as can be seen in our frequent misperception of the “color” black.
 
In this video, Applications Engineer Jodi Baker provides an overview and demonstration on unique accessories for Konica Minolta Sensing’s CM-600d and CM-700d spectrophotometers. These accessories are simple additions ideal for wet specimens, powders, or dusty environments, and are used to maintain an instrument and enhance its performance.
 
Blog: Pharmaceutical uses of Spectrophotometers for R&D Control   Tech Tips
Blog: Pharmaceutical Uses of Spectrophotometers for R&D Control   Tech Tip: Transfer a Colorimetric Target from Software to Instrument
Pharmaceutical companies must monitor and control production of the small molecules they manufacture and often rely on spectrophotometers for many of these procedures. It is no surprise that the ingredients used in making pharmaceuticals are highly regulated, requiring a series of tests and quality control steps to ensure that patients are receiving safe and correct dosages.
 
SpectraMagic NX software is a valuable tool used to store color measurement results, retrieve color standards, and analyze data for seamless quality control of a product’s color. This month’s Tech Tip provides step-by-step instructions on how to input a colorimetric target into SpectraMagic NX software and download the target to your color measurement instrument.


Did You Know?

The orange and black colors of Halloween are thought to have originated from the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain when candles and fires (orange) were lit to welcome the cold, black winter ahead every October 31st.